You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘hunting’ tag.

Lacy owners are always wanting to know what kinds of activities and training are fun to do with their working breed. Most of our dogs work seasonally which can mean weeks or months of down time.

Antler hunting is simple nose work and a fun search and scenting activity for virtually all dogs. It’s easy to learn and provides mental and physical stimulation.

It is easy to teach a dog to find shed antlers through basic reward based training. To start out, you present an antler to the dog and every time the dog pays noses or mouths the antler , mark the behavior with good feedback and rewarded the dog with a high value food item. After a few repetitions, the dog will be excited to find an antler in anticipation of earning a reward.

After a few repetitions, you can begin hiding the antlers and encouraging the dog to search for them.

Some dogs are more food driven and will work harder for a food reward. Others are more motivated by toys and play so their reward might be to have the antler tossed for them so they can chase and retrieve it.

 When we practice shed hunting, I will plant several sheds over a large area. It helps to wear gloves so the oils from your skin do not contaminate the antler. Fresh antlers are better than old, dry antlers. In fact, Spring is the best time to take a dog hunting because freshly shed antlers are ripe with fresh scent from the buck’s head hair, blood, and skin cells.

Like bird dogs, antler dogs work about 50 yards in front of a hunter. I work the dog into the wind to maximize the air currents. Antler dogs will cover at least three times the area a hunter could, including tight spots the hunter cannot easily access.

Here are a couple of videos of Rowdy working. The first video is longer the second. In both videos, you can see where she catches the scent downwind.

Advertisements

Set your DVR and clear your schedule — Lacys are coming to a TV near you on June 16 at 9 p.m. CT!

In March, a film crew from the History Channel spent the day filming Lacys for the series Life After People. They feature several dog breeds in the series, highlighting just how dependent most canines are on people. But the story of the Lacy is different. A tough breed with the drive and skills to fend for themselves, Lacy Dogs would they have no problem surviving in a world without people.

We got the dogs to pull off some great tricks for the camera, and the original footage will be accompanied by an interview with Jimmy Brooks, the president of the National Lacy Dog Association who has been breeding Lacys for over 50 years.

Don’t miss the Lacy episode of Life After People on June 16 at 9 p.m. CT. More information about this fascinating series from the History Channel after the jump. Read the rest of this entry »

Lacys were developed to be an all-around working dog. Our new series, Lacys at Work, explores the numerous jobs the breed excels at.

jerry and diggerWhat is blood tracking?
Blood tracking is the art of using a dog to trail and find wounded game. In Texas, blood dogs are mainly used to trail wounded deer. Hunting leases in this part of the world range anywhere from $8 to $20 per acre and trophy deer packages may cost anywhere from $2,500 to $20,000, so any tool that can be utilized to recover a wounded deer is well worth the effort. Blood tracking dogs are trained to follow a scent trail of blood as well as microscopic scent particles eliminated from a deer’s wound. An experienced dog will also track the scent from the inter-digital gland located between the hoofs when a blood trail runs out.

How do blood tracking dogs work?
Tracking dogs utilize any scent particle that is eliminated from a deer’s wound or body to find the animal. These scents are not only limited to blood, they also include stomach material, other tissue and tarsal gland secretions. The dogs must be able to associate the blood track and scent it is following with one particular wounded deer, staying on track even if another deer has walked over the trail. An experienced dog will be able to avoid all distractions and remain focused on its task. When a dog finds a dead deer, they normally stay by their find and begin to eat on it. A live wounded deer is another story. The dog must be able hold the animal in one area by baying, and if the bay breaks, the dog must be able to stop the deer by biting it in the leg and keep baying it until the handler arrives to dispatch the deer. Read the rest of this entry »

The Kemmer Mountain Cur got top billing at ESPN with Curs and ‘Coons: Good old boys love their mountain dogs. Developed by Robert Kemmer to tree small game in the Tennessee mountains, these raccoon and squirrel specialists have a lot in common with Lacys. And Kemmers aren’t the only curs that have shown up on ESPN. Last year they ran a story on Uncle Earl’s Hog Dog Trials, the most famous bay competition in the United States.

Despite being a true American tradition, hunting with hounds faces steep political opposition. Currently, Virginia dog owners are fighting to keep the right-to-retrieve, which allows them to fetch dogs that hunt their way onto private property. During a Oct. 23 hearing, the state agreed to take recommended retrieval restrictions into consideration. No matter where you live or what you hunt, stand up for rights of other dog hunters. This type of legislation can set a precedent for other states to restrict what we can do with our Lacys.

But hunters, don’t forget to be safe! A man in Oregon was shot by his Labrador Retriever while duck hunting. When the dog jumped into their boat, he set of the 12-gauge shotgun, resulting in some painful but treatable injuries.

Lacys were developed to be an all-around working dog. Our new series, Lacys at Work, explores the numerous jobs the breed excels at.

lacy hog dogs

What is hog hunting?
Tracking and dispatching feral hogs is both a sport and an important public service. Feral hogs are an issue for ranchers, farmers and homeowners alike. Rooting and wallowing activity can destroy agricultural land and disrupt delicate ecosystems. They eat and trample crops and the eggs of ground nesting birds. Wild hogs can also transmit disease such as pseudorabies and brucellosis to domestic animals. With over 4 million feral hogs in the United States and nearly 2 million in Texas alone, the objective of hog hunting is to control the population and minimize damage.

How do hog dogs work?
Because feral hogs are extremely hardy and intelligent, hunting with dogs is often a more efficient way to control the population than trapping or traditional hunting. Often working in a pack, hog dogs use their keen sense of smell to track their quarry. When they find and corner a hog, they “bay,” which is a type of repetitive barking. Baying helps contain the hog while alerting the other dogs and handlers to its location. Should the hog break and run, the dogs pursue and stop it. Like a herding dog controls livestock, a hog dog works to keep their animal in one place until the handler arrives. Read the rest of this entry »

larry-deerDeer meat is a great food for your dog. Now that we are officially into the 2008 deer hunting season in Texas, it’s the perfect time to start feeding raw venison.

Dogs are classified as carnivores. There is a mere .2% difference between dog and wolf DNA. If we realize that our dogs are so closely related to wolves, then it is a short step to understanding our dogs should eat like the wolf rather than eating junk out of a bag.

An ideal meal for our domestic wolves, also know as Lacy dogs, is raw on-the-hoof deer meat. Many hunters have deer meat left over from previous year, and that is fine to feed to your dogs, but today I am writing about feeding the deer that is freshly shot and ready for the dog to eat. Read the rest of this entry »

%d bloggers like this: