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Save the date! Our annual Working Dog Field Day is Saturday, April 12th at Reveille Peak Ranch in Burnet, Texas.

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Hog Baying
Youth Archery Shoot hosted by the Lone Star Bowhunters Association
Blood Tracking Workshop
Texas Blood Trackers Tracking Certification
Rattlesnake Avoidance Clinic
Breeders Seminar by J.P. Yousha
Demos
Raffle and Benefit Fundraiser – Win a Yeti!
Meet & Greet
Fishing, camping, biking, and more!

The fee of admission is $10 for adults / $5 for kids under 12.

Hog baying ($5 per run)
Blood trailing workshop ($35 per dog / handler team)
Breeders seminar
Rattlesnake avoidance clinic ($50 per dog)
Demos (trapping, treeing, and search & rescue)
Raffle fundraiser

Raffle tickets $5 each or 5 for $20. – This year, we are raffling off a 45 qt. Yeti, dog gear from Mud River, knives, and some other cool prizes.

Tentative schedule:

Hog Baying – All Day

Lone Star Bowhunters Association kid archery shoot – All Day

10 am – 12:30pm – Blood trailing workshop

12:00pm – 1:30pm – Lunch & Rattlesnake Avoidance

1:30pm – 2:30pm – Seminar on Dog Breeding

2:30pm – 3:00pm – Search and Rescue Demo

3:00pm – 3:30pm – Trapping and Treeing demo

4:00pm – Raffle drawing and social

***Must Pre – Register for Blood Trailing Workshop and TBT Tracking Certification.****

Accommodations:

Thunderbird Resort – pet friendly cabins on the lake
512-756-4878

Best Western Post Oak Inn in Burnet
512-756-4747

Reveille Peak Ranch
www.rprtexas.com

All other questions, contact Courtney at 214-679-1801 or nationallacydog@gmail.com

Questions? Send us a message!

Reveille Peak Ranch

105 Cr 114, Burnet, TX

From Burnet, go West on Hwy 29 for 3 miles. Turn Right on FM 2341. Go 4 and a half miles and turn left on CR 114. You will see the ranch on your left.

For information, call Courtney @ 214-679-1801 or email nationallacydog@gmail.com

See you there!

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bt2The National Lacy Dog Association will be hosting two seminars and a snake avoidance clinic Saturday, September 21st at Reveille Peak Ranch in Burnet, Texas.

$25 per dog  (Open to all breeds)

$45 per dog for rattlesnake avoidance

8am – Noon: Rattlesnake Avoidance with Fred Reyna

9:30 – Noon: Blood Trailing Seminar 

Topics include:

-Philosophies on dog training and behavior
-Selecting a tracking prospect
-Building and nurturing motivation + mental conditioning
-Laying artificial lines
-Leash work
-Working off lead
-Trash breaking & Cross training dos and don’ts

Plus, every dog will get some field work and everyone that signs up will get a container of deer blood to take home with them.

12:30 – 2:00: Antler Tracking / Shed Dog Seminar – Introduction to starting a companion shed hunting dog. 

All Events will take place under a covered pavillion and we will have pizza for lunch. 

Reveille Peak Ranch

105 Cr 114, Burnet, TX

From Burnet, go West on Hwy 29 for 3 miles. Turn Right on FM 2341. Go 4 and a half miles and turn left on CR 114. You will see the ranch on your left.

For information, call Courtney @ 214-679-1801 or email nationallacydog@gmail.com

See you there!

Working Blue Lacy DogThe NLDA would like to recognize the contributions of our members and celebrate the achievements of their Lacy dogs.

Next Summer, members will be able to nominate and vote for Dog of the Year and Member of the Year.

The Dog of the Year award is meant to recognize the achievements of a Lacy Dog that exemplifies the best of our breed to the community.

The Member of the Year award will go to a person to recognize their work for the breed and/or the organization either for outstanding work in that year or in recognition for many years of dedication to the breed.

To be eligible for Dog of the Year, the dog must be owned by a member in good standing of the NLDA. For Member of the Year, the person must be a member in good standing of the NLDA

Candidates for both awards will be nominated by members this coming June and the election will be run in conjunction with our annual election.

More details to come. In the meantime, we encourage our members to begin documenting and sharing their dog’s successes and achievements.

DS Outlook Cover

Local magazine highlights Lacy history.

Article by Courtney Farris

National Lacy Dog Association

You won’t see them in the show ring, but people with roots in the Texas Hill Country know what they look like and what they are supposed to do, and have for over 100 years. The Lacy Dog, also known as the Blue Lacy or Lacy Hog Dog was created during the late 19th century to work free ranging hogs.

The Lacy family moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to a homestead in Marble Falls in 1858. The brothers were rock masons by trade and George Lacy owned Granite Mountain in Marble Falls which provided the granite used during the construction of the state capitol building in Austin.

The Lacys also raised hogs to supplement their income. During this time, Texans used hog dogs to round up wild range hogs that populated the Hill Country. The first hog dogs were usually hound crosses but the Lacy brothers created their own line of dogs to gather the family’s hogs and drive them to livestock markets in Austin. It appears they crossed an English Shepherd with a Greyhound and a wolf, resulting in a fast herding dog with the intense prey drive and fearlessness necessary for working dangerous hogs.

Also revered for their speed and intelligence the breed has become an all-around working dog for ranchers, cowboys, trappers and hunters. Though they can be trained to do almost anything, lacys make great hog dogs, cow dogs and trackers and most will make a serviceable tree dog. In fact, Lacys are gaining popularity in the West because of their versatility. A rancher can catch a mountain lion on Monday, check traps on Tuesday and push cows around on Wednesday. A hard-hunting dog capable of tracking a variety of predators is instrumental in keeping livestock safe from coyotes and big cats.

Compact and balanced, they are known for their unique blue coloration, though they can also be red or blue with tan points. In 2005, they were named the official State Dog of Texas and, given the tremendous impact the breed had on the Hill Country as well as the Lacy’s ties to the capitol building, they are Texas to the core.

Despite their high working drive and intense personalities, lacy dogs can be wonderful companions, as long as they are exercised and given a job to do. Like other working breeds, lacys require an experienced leader committed to their training and specific needs.

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