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The NLDA is proud to be part of the 2015 Texas Blood Trackers’ Annual Blood Tracking Seminar! 

Texas Blood Trackers Training Seminar

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Save the date! Our annual Working Dog Field Day is Saturday, April 12th at Reveille Peak Ranch in Burnet, Texas.

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Hog Baying
Youth Archery Shoot hosted by the Lone Star Bowhunters Association
Blood Tracking Workshop
Texas Blood Trackers Tracking Certification
Rattlesnake Avoidance Clinic
Breeders Seminar by J.P. Yousha
Demos
Raffle and Benefit Fundraiser – Win a Yeti!
Meet & Greet
Fishing, camping, biking, and more!

The fee of admission is $10 for adults / $5 for kids under 12.

Hog baying ($5 per run)
Blood trailing workshop ($35 per dog / handler team)
Breeders seminar
Rattlesnake avoidance clinic ($50 per dog)
Demos (trapping, treeing, and search & rescue)
Raffle fundraiser

Raffle tickets $5 each or 5 for $20. – This year, we are raffling off a 45 qt. Yeti, dog gear from Mud River, knives, and some other cool prizes.

Tentative schedule:

Hog Baying – All Day

Lone Star Bowhunters Association kid archery shoot – All Day

10 am – 12:30pm – Blood trailing workshop

12:00pm – 1:30pm – Lunch & Rattlesnake Avoidance

1:30pm – 2:30pm – Seminar on Dog Breeding

2:30pm – 3:00pm – Search and Rescue Demo

3:00pm – 3:30pm – Trapping and Treeing demo

4:00pm – Raffle drawing and social

***Must Pre – Register for Blood Trailing Workshop and TBT Tracking Certification.****

Accommodations:

Thunderbird Resort – pet friendly cabins on the lake
512-756-4878

Best Western Post Oak Inn in Burnet
512-756-4747

Reveille Peak Ranch
www.rprtexas.com

All other questions, contact Courtney at 214-679-1801 or nationallacydog@gmail.com

Questions? Send us a message!

Reveille Peak Ranch

105 Cr 114, Burnet, TX

From Burnet, go West on Hwy 29 for 3 miles. Turn Right on FM 2341. Go 4 and a half miles and turn left on CR 114. You will see the ranch on your left.

For information, call Courtney @ 214-679-1801 or email nationallacydog@gmail.com

See you there!

bt2The National Lacy Dog Association will be hosting two seminars and a snake avoidance clinic Saturday, September 21st at Reveille Peak Ranch in Burnet, Texas.

$25 per dog  (Open to all breeds)

$45 per dog for rattlesnake avoidance

8am – Noon: Rattlesnake Avoidance with Fred Reyna

9:30 – Noon: Blood Trailing Seminar 

Topics include:

-Philosophies on dog training and behavior
-Selecting a tracking prospect
-Building and nurturing motivation + mental conditioning
-Laying artificial lines
-Leash work
-Working off lead
-Trash breaking & Cross training dos and don’ts

Plus, every dog will get some field work and everyone that signs up will get a container of deer blood to take home with them.

12:30 – 2:00: Antler Tracking / Shed Dog Seminar – Introduction to starting a companion shed hunting dog. 

All Events will take place under a covered pavillion and we will have pizza for lunch. 

Reveille Peak Ranch

105 Cr 114, Burnet, TX

From Burnet, go West on Hwy 29 for 3 miles. Turn Right on FM 2341. Go 4 and a half miles and turn left on CR 114. You will see the ranch on your left.

For information, call Courtney @ 214-679-1801 or email nationallacydog@gmail.com

See you there!

Host Babe Winkelman and Pro archer Mike Wheeler share their archery adventures for trophy whitetail bucks in Kansas. A lacy dog makes an appearance as the outfitter’s trusty tracking dog.

Fred works with Slate

About 2 dozen people and dogs gathered for the NLDA’s first tracking challenge and field day event of 2012.

The weather was nearly perfect for the weekend’s events. After the trials, participants were able to enjoy a delicious lunch and share stories.

Other events included snake avoidance training, trapping, and hog baying.

As always, new friends were made and the bar was set for future NLDA tracking events. We are grateful to everyone who joined us. The success of the NLDA depends upon the gracious support of the working dog community. We strive to provide activities for skilled dogs and their owners to partake in and be recognized for exceptional performance.

Results of the tracking challenge:

Junior Tracker

1st – Ron Jones & Allison
Score 93.0
Time 1m 56s

2nd – Arnie Alexander & Slate
Score 75.0
Time 6m 37s

3rd – Jimmy Brooks & Gracy
Score 67.0
Time 6m 47s

Senior Tracker

1st – Jamie Wilhelm & Rein
Score 100
Time 3m 13s

2nd – Robby Leek & Colt
Score 58
Time 12m 26s

Master Tracker

1st – Ron Jones & Allison
Score 92
Time 4m 02s

2nd – Betty Leek & Lucy
Score 90
Time 7m 33s

3rd – Marty Thomas & Bagley
Score 82
Time 6m 30s

4th- Jim Rogers & Stormy
Score 72
Time 12m 20s

5th- Robby Leek & Ben
Score 72
Time 13m 06s

Lucy and 2nd place Ribbon for the Master Trail

Lacys were developed to be an all-around working dog. Our new series, Lacys at Work, explores the numerous jobs the breed excels at.

jerry and diggerWhat is blood tracking?
Blood tracking is the art of using a dog to trail and find wounded game. In Texas, blood dogs are mainly used to trail wounded deer. Hunting leases in this part of the world range anywhere from $8 to $20 per acre and trophy deer packages may cost anywhere from $2,500 to $20,000, so any tool that can be utilized to recover a wounded deer is well worth the effort. Blood tracking dogs are trained to follow a scent trail of blood as well as microscopic scent particles eliminated from a deer’s wound. An experienced dog will also track the scent from the inter-digital gland located between the hoofs when a blood trail runs out.

How do blood tracking dogs work?
Tracking dogs utilize any scent particle that is eliminated from a deer’s wound or body to find the animal. These scents are not only limited to blood, they also include stomach material, other tissue and tarsal gland secretions. The dogs must be able to associate the blood track and scent it is following with one particular wounded deer, staying on track even if another deer has walked over the trail. An experienced dog will be able to avoid all distractions and remain focused on its task. When a dog finds a dead deer, they normally stay by their find and begin to eat on it. A live wounded deer is another story. The dog must be able hold the animal in one area by baying, and if the bay breaks, the dog must be able to stop the deer by biting it in the leg and keep baying it until the handler arrives to dispatch the deer. Read the rest of this entry »

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