Purebred doesn’t necessarily mean well-bred and a well-bred Lacy Dog is more than a piece of paper. Though pedigrees will give yBlue Lacy puppyou important insights into a dog’s lineage, registration does not guarantee a puppy will look or work like a Lacy Dog. When picking out a puppy, these are the things a buyer should expect from an ethical Lacy breeder. Among other things, an ethical breeder should be educated about genetics, structure, anatomy, purpose, animal health, behavior, and training methods.

1.) Breeding for working ability. An ethical breeder will be able to show you their Lacys at work. If that is not geographically possible, they will have videos or numerous photos available for potential buyers. If you want a true working Lacy,  you should only buy a puppy out of working parents. Though pet breeders will occasionally produce a good hunting or herding dog, the odds are against it.

2.) Breeding to standard. In addition to being proven working dogs, breeding stock should fit the conformation standard. It is important that the dogs are the  right size, ideally 17 to 22 inch and 30 to 50 pounds, so they can perform the jobs they were created for in the Texas brush and heat. Dogs should not look like hounds (long ears or drooping lips) nor should they look like pit bulls (pricked ears or  overly heavy, loaded shoulders). Ethical breeders will only use standard dogs in their breeding program.

3.) Breeding for temperament. Lacys are tough working dogs. They should be driven, gritty and capable of getting the job done. Many are protective of their property and people. They also have a strong pack instinct and will correct other dogs. But truly aggressive dogs should never be bred. Dogs who bite people or wantonly attack other dogs have no place in a breeding program.

4.) Places puppies in working homes. Lacys can make great companions, but they are not meant to be purely pets. Ethical breeders not only breed working stock, they sell to working homes. If you don’t have a real job for a Lacy, you should look at another breed.

5.) Emphasizes health and proper care. Ethical breeders only cross healthy dogs from healthy lines. They keep their dogs in a clean and healthy environment. They either feed a raw diet or quality dog food. They give their dogs the best care possible. And they will encourage potential owners to do the same.

All ethical breeders will welcome you to their home and kennel. They will let you meet the parents and prove their working ability. They will also require you prove yourself worthy of a Lacy Dog. It is vital to the preservation of the breed and the happiness of each dog that they end up in the right environment.

Breeders who breed the family pet to any convenient dog of same breed just to have purebred pups “with papers” or produce several litters a year are in it for profit, not to preserve and improve the breed. If you have any questions about litters, bloodlines or breeders, please send us an email.

 

 

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Hey Texas bowhunters, the LSBA Annual Awards Banquet, Expo & Pop-up 3-D Shoot is just a little over a month away June 14, 2014, at Reunion Ranch in Georgetown, Texas.

Guest Speakers will be Mike and Bonnie McFerrin from the Outdoor Channel’s The Legends of the Fall. They will be there throughout the day to sign autographs and will do a question and answer session during the Banquet, so get your questions ready.

The NLDA will be there with a tracking dog seminar & shed antler dog demo. We are also raffling off a Yeti Roadie.

Pop-up 3-D Tournament with Jerry Boyles and Team Bowmasters of Arkansas begins 10:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m. Blood Trailing Seminar by Courtney Farris, National Lacy Dog Association

12:00 p.m. Expo and Vendors Open; MDH Outdoors will have their Techno Hunt trailer set up

2:00 p.m. Shed Hunting Seminar by Courtney Farris, National Lacy Dog Association

6:00 p.m. 40th Anniversary Annual Awards Banquet begins

Hope to see you there!!! This event is open to the general public. You do not have to be a member to attend!

http://lonestarbowhunter.com/

Hotel information for the Banquet:

Best Western Plus Georgetown Inn & Suites
600 San Gabriel Village Boulevard
Georgetown, Texas 78626
512 868-8555

There are both king and two queen rooms available for both Friday and Saturday nights. Best Western is a pet friendly hotel.

Rate is $92.00 per night.

 

Save the date! Our annual Working Dog Field Day is Saturday, April 12th at Reveille Peak Ranch in Burnet, Texas.

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Hog Baying
Youth Archery Shoot hosted by the Lone Star Bowhunters Association
Blood Tracking Workshop
Texas Blood Trackers Tracking Certification
Rattlesnake Avoidance Clinic
Breeders Seminar by J.P. Yousha
Demos
Raffle and Benefit Fundraiser – Win a Yeti!
Meet & Greet
Fishing, camping, biking, and more!

The fee of admission is $10 for adults / $5 for kids under 12.

Hog baying ($5 per run)
Blood trailing workshop ($35 per dog / handler team)
Breeders seminar
Rattlesnake avoidance clinic ($50 per dog)
Demos (trapping, treeing, and search & rescue)
Raffle fundraiser

Raffle tickets $5 each or 5 for $20. – This year, we are raffling off a 45 qt. Yeti, dog gear from Mud River, knives, and some other cool prizes.

Tentative schedule:

Hog Baying – All Day

Lone Star Bowhunters Association kid archery shoot – All Day

10 am – 12:30pm – Blood trailing workshop

12:00pm – 1:30pm – Lunch & Rattlesnake Avoidance

1:30pm – 2:30pm – Seminar on Dog Breeding

2:30pm – 3:00pm – Search and Rescue Demo

3:00pm – 3:30pm – Trapping and Treeing demo

4:00pm – Raffle drawing and social

***Must Pre – Register for Blood Trailing Workshop and TBT Tracking Certification.****

Accommodations:

Thunderbird Resort – pet friendly cabins on the lake
512-756-4878

Best Western Post Oak Inn in Burnet
512-756-4747

Reveille Peak Ranch
www.rprtexas.com

All other questions, contact Courtney at 214-679-1801 or nationallacydog@gmail.com

Questions? Send us a message!

Reveille Peak Ranch

105 Cr 114, Burnet, TX

From Burnet, go West on Hwy 29 for 3 miles. Turn Right on FM 2341. Go 4 and a half miles and turn left on CR 114. You will see the ranch on your left.

For information, call Courtney @ 214-679-1801 or email nationallacydog@gmail.com

See you there!

bt2The National Lacy Dog Association will be hosting two seminars and a snake avoidance clinic Saturday, September 21st at Reveille Peak Ranch in Burnet, Texas.

$25 per dog  (Open to all breeds)

$45 per dog for rattlesnake avoidance

8am – Noon: Rattlesnake Avoidance with Fred Reyna

9:30 – Noon: Blood Trailing Seminar 

Topics include:

-Philosophies on dog training and behavior
-Selecting a tracking prospect
-Building and nurturing motivation + mental conditioning
-Laying artificial lines
-Leash work
-Working off lead
-Trash breaking & Cross training dos and don’ts

Plus, every dog will get some field work and everyone that signs up will get a container of deer blood to take home with them.

12:30 – 2:00: Antler Tracking / Shed Dog Seminar - Introduction to starting a companion shed hunting dog. 

All Events will take place under a covered pavillion and we will have pizza for lunch. 

Reveille Peak Ranch

105 Cr 114, Burnet, TX

From Burnet, go West on Hwy 29 for 3 miles. Turn Right on FM 2341. Go 4 and a half miles and turn left on CR 114. You will see the ranch on your left.

For information, call Courtney @ 214-679-1801 or email nationallacydog@gmail.com

See you there!

Working Blue Lacy DogThe NLDA would like to recognize the contributions of our members and celebrate the achievements of their Lacy dogs.

Next Summer, members will be able to nominate and vote for Dog of the Year and Member of the Year.

The Dog of the Year award is meant to recognize the achievements of a Lacy Dog that exemplifies the best of our breed to the community.

The Member of the Year award will go to a person to recognize their work for the breed and/or the organization either for outstanding work in that year or in recognition for many years of dedication to the breed.

To be eligible for Dog of the Year, the dog must be owned by a member in good standing of the NLDA. For Member of the Year, the person must be a member in good standing of the NLDA

Candidates for both awards will be nominated by members this coming June and the election will be run in conjunction with our annual election.

More details to come. In the meantime, we encourage our members to begin documenting and sharing their dog’s successes and achievements.

Lacy owners are always wanting to know what kinds of activities and training are fun to do with their working breed. Most of our dogs work seasonally which can mean weeks or months of down time.

Antler hunting is simple nose work and a fun search and scenting activity for virtually all dogs. It’s easy to learn and provides mental and physical stimulation.

It is easy to teach a dog to find shed antlers through basic reward based training. To start out, you present an antler to the dog and every time the dog pays noses or mouths the antler , mark the behavior with good feedback and rewarded the dog with a high value food item. After a few repetitions, the dog will be excited to find an antler in anticipation of earning a reward.

After a few repetitions, you can begin hiding the antlers and encouraging the dog to search for them.

Some dogs are more food driven and will work harder for a food reward. Others are more motivated by toys and play so their reward might be to have the antler tossed for them so they can chase and retrieve it.

 When we practice shed hunting, I will plant several sheds over a large area. It helps to wear gloves so the oils from your skin do not contaminate the antler. Fresh antlers are better than old, dry antlers. In fact, Spring is the best time to take a dog hunting because freshly shed antlers are ripe with fresh scent from the buck’s head hair, blood, and skin cells.

Like bird dogs, antler dogs work about 50 yards in front of a hunter. I work the dog into the wind to maximize the air currents. Antler dogs will cover at least three times the area a hunter could, including tight spots the hunter cannot easily access.

Here are a couple of videos of Rowdy working. The first video is longer the second. In both videos, you can see where she catches the scent downwind.

As part of our ongoing commitment to supporting the working dog community, the NLDA will be sponsoring a canine Search and Rescue team through the Greater Houston Search Dogs organization.

SAR teams provide search and rescue services to law enforcement, fire departments and other public safety agencies free of charge. Specialized canine teams, composed of certified handlers and canines, require extensive training, maintenance and equipment in order to deploy safely and successfully.

Volunteer handlers are not paid for their time or service and they are responsible for the entire cost of training, maintenance and equipment for their canine partners.

A portion of the proceeds from this fundraiser will directly support a canine SAR team.

From now until the Working Dog Field Day on May 11th, 2013, tickets may be purchased by using the secure checkout on our webpage or over the phone by calling (214) 679-1801 until 4 pm the day of the event. Tickets will also be available at the Working Dog Field Day at Reveille Peak Ranch on Saturday, May 11th from 9 am until 4 pm.

>>———-> Click Here to Use Secure Checkout

You need not be present to win.

There will be 2 different raffle pools containing prizes; Lucky Dog and Texas Adventures. Your name and number of tickets will go in to the drawing for those prizes. A ticket will be drawn for each prize in the pool.

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The Lucky Dog Raffle – 5 Winners – Tickets are $5 each or 5 for $20

One 45 quart Yeti Cooler – $329 Value
One Tri-Tronics Sport Basic G3 Collar – $219 Value
One Mud River Dog Handler’s Bag – $44 Value
One Subscription to Extreme Hog Hunter Magazine (formally Bayed Solid) – $27.50 Value
2 Cable Leads from Wild Boar USA – $23 Value

Texas Adventure Raffle – 3 Winners – Tickets are $10 each

One Texas Mesquite Custom STIC knife – $100 Value
One guided striper fishing trip on Lake Buchanan for 2 (lodging not included) – $500 Value
One Whitetail Doe hunt on a private ranch near Mason, Texas – bow or rifle (lodging available) – $250 Value.

And please take the time to check out the many Friends of the NLDA who have so generously donated prizes for this worthy cause: Tri-Tronics, Wild Boar USA, Extreme Hog Hunter, Mud River and Gun Dog Supply.com.
DS Outlook Cover

Local magazine highlights Lacy history.

Article by Courtney Farris

National Lacy Dog Association

You won’t see them in the show ring, but people with roots in the Texas Hill Country know what they look like and what they are supposed to do, and have for over 100 years. The Lacy Dog, also known as the Blue Lacy or Lacy Hog Dog was created during the late 19th century to work free ranging hogs.

The Lacy family moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to a homestead in Marble Falls in 1858. The brothers were rock masons by trade and George Lacy owned Granite Mountain in Marble Falls which provided the granite used during the construction of the state capitol building in Austin.

The Lacys also raised hogs to supplement their income. During this time, Texans used hog dogs to round up wild range hogs that populated the Hill Country. The first hog dogs were usually hound crosses but the Lacy brothers created their own line of dogs to gather the family’s hogs and drive them to livestock markets in Austin. It appears they crossed an English Shepherd with a Greyhound and a wolf, resulting in a fast herding dog with the intense prey drive and fearlessness necessary for working dangerous hogs.

Also revered for their speed and intelligence the breed has become an all-around working dog for ranchers, cowboys, trappers and hunters. Though they can be trained to do almost anything, lacys make great hog dogs, cow dogs and trackers and most will make a serviceable tree dog. In fact, Lacys are gaining popularity in the West because of their versatility. A rancher can catch a mountain lion on Monday, check traps on Tuesday and push cows around on Wednesday. A hard-hunting dog capable of tracking a variety of predators is instrumental in keeping livestock safe from coyotes and big cats.

Compact and balanced, they are known for their unique blue coloration, though they can also be red or blue with tan points. In 2005, they were named the official State Dog of Texas and, given the tremendous impact the breed had on the Hill Country as well as the Lacy’s ties to the capitol building, they are Texas to the core.

Despite their high working drive and intense personalities, lacy dogs can be wonderful companions, as long as they are exercised and given a job to do. Like other working breeds, lacys require an experienced leader committed to their training and specific needs.

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If you want to hunt lions and bears, you have to find lions and bears…and in the vast rugged West, that is often easier said than done. For decades, dogs have helped hunters and ranchers locate, track, and tree game in a variety of conditions. Traditionally a roll fulfilled by hounds, Lacys, cur dogs and similar breeds are gaining popularity as effective tree dogs because of their intelligence and versatility.

Mountain lion in Nevada

A mountain lion is generally quick to tree. Photo by Cory Davidson.

“You can go catch a lion Monday, check traps on Tuesday and push cows around on Wednesday,” says Cory Davidson of Central Nevada. Multi purpose dogs are ideal for ranchers. A dog capable of tracking a variety of predators is instrumental in keeping livestock safe from coyotes and big cats. Cory hunts with a mixed pack of hounds and one Lacy. He admires the speed of a Lacy dog and believes they hunt harder…even though the hounds possess a cold nose for picking up the oldest tracks.

Lions, bears, and small game such as racoons and squirrels resort to climbing trees or ledges for safety. Once the dogs have located a track and found the quarry, their job is to push it up a tree and surround the base, baying to keep the animal from fleeing. Dogs that bay consistently and maintain respect for the cat or bear are more effective at holding the animal and less likely to be wounded or killed.

A multi purpose dog does require a bit more time to train. It’s easier to train a pup from experienced dogs than to start from scratch.

Since Lacys are so intelligent, they are easy to teach to track and tree. Most hunters start puppies on drags where a line is tied to a lion pelt (or whichever type of animal you intend to hunt) and drug through the woods. As with blood tracking, a good tracker must be conditioned to track. This means nurturing the desire to hunt and locate prey by keeping it fun and rewarding for the dog. There are few things more fun and exciting to a bay dog than a critter in a cage. A live animal can be trapped and a put it into a cage for the dog to bay and chase across the ground. Though not often thought of as a treeing breed, Lacys can be taught to tree very easily by suspending a caged animal from a tree where the dog has to opportunity to approach the tree and become excited about the prize in the top.

Teaching a lacy to tree is easy!

Lacys and cur dogs are well-balanced breeds, adaptable to various types of hunting and terrain. Their agility, speed, and a baying style that is unrelenting make them good choices for hunting predators in rough country. Although not specifically bred for treeing abilities, they are intelligent enough to learn to tree very quickly and can become proficient in trailing and treeing bear, cougar and bobcat when hunted in packs.

Host Babe Winkelman and Pro archer Mike Wheeler share their archery adventures for trophy whitetail bucks in Kansas. A lacy dog makes an appearance as the outfitter’s trusty tracking dog.

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